Go to USC home page USC Logo Salary Administration Office
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA
HUMAN RESOURCES HOME | HUMAN RESOURCES STAFF | HUMAN RESOURCES FORMS

BENEFITS

EMPLOYEE RELATIONS

EMPLOYMENT

INTERNATIONAL SUPPORT FOR FACULTY AND STAFF

ORGANIZATIONAL & PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

SALARY ADMINISTRATION
HR COMMUNICATIONS

A–Z WEBSITE INDEX

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

HR ANNOUNCEMENTS

POLICIES & PROCEDURES

RELATED LINKS
USC  THIS SITE
Broadbanding—A New System

Go Straight to Questions & Answers

On July 1, 1996, the State implemented a new classification and compensation system to streamline the process of defining state jobs and determining pay for classified staff.

Called "broadbanding," these administrative changes make the system easier to use and understand. Broadbanding does not alter your current salary, although you do have a new state job title.

The S.C. Budget and Control Board's Office of Human Resources was directed to simplify and improve the existing classification and compensation system. Since its establishment in 1969, the system has grown to include over 2,500 job classes and 50 pay grades. It had the potential of becoming even more complicated. In the effort to simplify the system, job classes have been reduced to less than 800 and pay grades have been consolidated into 10 pay bands.

Impact of the Changes
Although you have a new state title, you will notice few other changes under the new system. There are no salary increases or decreases associated with these changes. Your new salary range is larger than your current range.

New Job Classes and Titles
To reduce the number of job classes and titles, the State took the current classes that are similar in function and grouped them together into more general job classes. The combined job classes have been assigned new titles.

For example, throughout state government, mid- to upper-level managers were classified in dozens of categories, but many now fall under the general title of Program Manager, regardless of where they work or their job assignment.

New Pay Bands
The former pay schedule had 50 separate pay grades. The new pay schedule consists of 10 broader pay bands. The new pay bands have more jobs within a single salary range, and the University has more flexibility to determine salaries and salary increases within these bands.

Your former pay grade determined your band assignment in the new system. For example, if you were an Administrative Assistant I, Grade 25 with an annual salary of $23,000 per year, your salary remains the same, your job is in Band 4, and your job title has been changed to Administrative Assistant.

The following chart shows how the former grade levels fit into the new pay bands.

This chart is effective July 1, 2001. Visit the Salary Chart webpage to view current salary ranges by band.
Pay Band Minimum Midpoint Maximum
01 10,712 16,485 22,259
02 14,644 20,869 27,094
03 17,819 25,394 32,969
04 21,679 30,893 40,108
05 26,378 37,591 48,804
06 32,099 45,742 59,386
07 39,055 55,654 72,254
08 47,519 67,717 87,915
09 57,817 82,392 106,967
10 70,348 100,248 130,149


Questions and Answers

Q. Why did the State change the system?

A. To reduce the number of job classes and make it simpler for state agencies to manage employee compensation by placing more responsibility for day-to-day decisions at the agency level.


Q. Does the change in pay grades affect my salary?

A. No salary increases or decreases are associated with these changes.


Q. How do the classification and compensation changes affect me and my job?

A. You should notice only minor changes. Your state job title has changed and your salary range is wider. Your pay level and job duties do not change.


Q. Since the broader pay ranges decrease the number of reclassifications, are there other ways for my salary to increase?

A. Yes. Though there will be fewer reclassifications, the University will be able to recognize significant job changes with "in-band" pay increases for:

  • employees assigned significant additional duties,
  • outstanding performance by employees, or
  • employees who develop additional knowledge/skills that enhance their job.
Please refer to the University's policy for specifics on the awarding of salary increases.


Q. How will in-band salary increases be funded?

A. Funding for in-band pay increases will come from the University's existing budget.


Q. How can I find out my new title and salary range?

A. The University's Salary Administration Office sent a letter in July to every employee confirming your state title and salary range.


Q. Who should I call if I have more questions?

A. You can call the University's Salary Administration Office at 777.3111 if you have questions about the new classification and compensation system and how it affects you as an employee or supervisor.

RETURN TO TOP
USC LINKS: DIRECTORY MAP EVENTS VIP
SITE INFORMATION